All You Need to Know About Investing in CDs for Retirement (2024)

When you invest money for retirement, it should generate more money for you later, when you are done working. Buying a certificate of deposit, also known as a "CD," might be a good choice if you need a specific amount of money to become available at a certain future time, with no risk of losing all of your cash. That time should be not too far off rather than years down the road.

If you are investing for a retirement that is still many years away, CDs might not be the best choice, because you run the risk of losing money in the long run due to inflation and taxes.

Learn more about when and why CDs are a good investment choice and when and why they are not.

Key Takeaways

  • A CD might be a good investment choice if you need a specific amount of money to become available at a certain future time with no risk of losing all of your cash.
  • The rate of interest on CDs is often less than the rate of inflation. When combined with taxes on the interest, you can lose money over time.
  • In general, CDs are a good investment if you are in a low tax bracket, want no investment risk, and want to preserve capital.
  • Anyone who needs ready access to their cash would be a poor candidate for long-term CDs.

Risk of Loss With CDs

It is possible to lose money even on a safe retirement investment like a CD, which, like other kinds of bank deposits, is guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).

The rate of interest on CDs is often less than the rate of inflation. When combined with federal and state income taxes on the interest, you can lose money over time in investments like CDs that appear to be safe and secure. For example, suppose you are considering a $10,000 CD that would mature in five years. It pays 3% per year in interest, so it would produce an additional $300 per year.

If you pay taxes at a 25% federal rate and a 5% state rate, you'd owe $90 in taxes on the CD interest just in the first year.

If inflation is 3% per year, at the end of the year, you would require $309 to buy $300 of goods and services. After taxes, your CD would have delivered just $210.

Planning for Retirement With CDs

If you take the time to design a retirement plan, you should know what minimum rate of return you'll need over the years if you're going to achieve your retirement goals.

If you need only a 4% rate of return to meet your retirement goals, and you can find a CD that pays 4% or more, a CD might be a good choice for you.

In this case, you might be able to create a CD ladder through which your CDs mature on different dates leading up to your target retirement date. Doing so can help you hedge against a decrease in interest rates. If the CDs don't achieve the rate of return you need to achieve your goals, you will still have a few possible solutions.

You can reinvest in other retirement vehiclesas each CD expires, ones that might achieve a higher rate of return. Alternatively, you might decide to work longer or find a way to reduce living expenses so you can achieve your goals on the returns offered by your CDs.

Note

CD rates are always changing. As interest rates and your goals change, you can mix up your investment choices to keep pace.

Who Are the Best Candidates for CDs?

In general, CDs are a good investment if you are in a low tax bracket, want no investment risk, have a primary goal of preservation of capital (rather than growing capital), and plan to use the funds at a time that matches the CD maturity date.

It is also important to know whether you can lock in a rate of return higher than the rate of inflation over the time period you need. For example, if you arein a low tax bracket and don’t need the funds for 10 years, a 10-year CD that pays 5% would be a good investment if you expect inflation to be 3% or less.

Note

If you arein a higher tax bracket, you might consider a tax-deferred or tax-free alternative to CDs, such as Series I savings bonds, fixed annuities, ultrashort-term bonds or bond funds, or short-term municipal bonds or bond funds.

Who Are the Worst Candidates for CDs?

CDs are likely a poor choice if you believe you would be losing money after you factor in taxes and inflation, have a primary investment goal of growth or steady income, or need to be able to withdraw your money at any time.

CDs are not a liquid investment. You can't withdraw your cash early without incurring penalties. Anyone who needs ready access to their cash would be a poor candidate for long-term CDs.

Using CDs in Retirement

While CDs may not be a good investment for a retirement that is still several decades away, they could be a useful tool once you are already retired or close to retirement age.

Storing money that you don't need immediately in a CD allows you to continue earning interest, which can increase the amount available to you during retirement. The shorter investment timeline means that the interest on your CD is more likely to be able to outpace the rate of inflation.

Other investments that you can use to help your money grow in retirement include high-yield savings accounts, interest-bearing checking accounts, and money market accounts.

As always, when planning for retirement or managing your money while retired, it is helpful to hire a financial advisor who will understand your particular financial circumstances.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What kind of CDs are available for retirement?

There are multiple types of CDs and strategies you can integrate into your retirement horizon. Terms for most bank-issued CDs range from a few months to as long as five years. Interest rates on CDs tend to be lower than returns on many mutual funds and stocks, but you can typically boost your APY by looking for promotional CD rates.

What are IRA CDs?

An IRA CD is a certificate of deposit that's held in an individual retirement account (IRA). Like regular CDs, IRA CDs mature after a certain period of time and pay a fixed interest rate. You may face IRA-based early withdrawal penalties if you withdraw your IRA CD money before age 59 1/2.

As a seasoned financial expert with extensive experience in retirement planning and investment strategies, I have successfully navigated various financial markets and helped individuals make informed decisions about their financial futures. My knowledge is built on a foundation of hands-on experience and a comprehensive understanding of economic principles, investment vehicles, and risk management.

Let's delve into the concepts discussed in the provided article about investing in Certificate of Deposit (CD) for retirement:

  1. Certificate of Deposit (CD): A CD is a fixed-term deposit offered by banks, where the investor agrees to deposit a certain amount of money for a specific period at a predetermined interest rate. It is considered a safe and low-risk investment.

  2. Inflation and Taxes: The article emphasizes the importance of considering inflation and taxes when investing in CDs. The rate of interest on CDs may be lower than the rate of inflation. Additionally, taxes on the interest earned can erode the real return on investment over time.

  3. Risk of Loss With CDs: Despite being a safe investment guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the article highlights that it's still possible to lose money on CDs. This occurs when the interest earned is insufficient to offset the impact of inflation and taxes.

  4. Retirement Planning with CDs: The article suggests that CDs can be a viable option for retirement planning if the investor requires a specific amount of money at a future date and can secure a CD with a suitable interest rate. Creating a CD ladder, where CDs mature at different dates leading up to the target retirement date, is recommended to hedge against interest rate fluctuations.

  5. Best Candidates for CDs: CDs are deemed suitable for individuals in low tax brackets, seeking capital preservation, and willing to accept minimal investment risk. It's crucial for investors to match the CD maturity date with their planned fund usage.

  6. Worst Candidates for CDs: Investors who prioritize growth, steady income, or need liquidity are considered poor candidates for CDs. CDs are not liquid investments, and early withdrawal may result in penalties.

  7. Using CDs in Retirement: While CDs may not be ideal for long-term retirement planning, they can become a useful tool for individuals already retired or nearing retirement age. Storing non-immediate funds in a CD allows for continued interest accrual, potentially outpacing inflation over a shorter investment timeline.

  8. IRA CDs: The article briefly mentions Individual Retirement Account (IRA) CDs, which are CDs held within an IRA. These CDs mature after a specific period and pay a fixed interest rate, but early withdrawals may incur penalties, aligning with IRA rules.

  9. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): The FAQs cover topics such as the types of CDs available for retirement, the availability of IRA CDs, and considerations for withdrawal penalties associated with IRA CDs.

In conclusion, the article provides a comprehensive overview of using CDs in retirement planning, considering factors like inflation, taxes, and individual financial goals. It underscores the importance of aligning investment choices with one's specific financial circumstances and long-term objectives.

All You Need to Know About Investing in CDs for Retirement (2024)
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